100 Must-Read Books About #carefreeblackfolks

Obviously, the hashtag #carefreeblackfolks cannot completely apply to a book someone would want to read; a book about a carefree person is going to be pretty boring. A book’s protagonist still needs a conflict, but their troubles do not have to be race related, or about, as we tend to refer to it, The Struggle.

Source: 100 Must-Read Books About #carefreeblackfolks

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100 Must-Read Books About #carefreeblackfolks

5 Fat-Positive Queer YA Books

Representation of fat people in YA has tended to be pretty dismal. As Kelly wrote last year, too often fat characters are portrayed as people “who have to overcome their weight in order to be seen as worthwhile or able to achieve their dreams, whatever they may be.” Happily, more YA novels with complex, fat characters have been coming out; pun intended, because now there are enough that I’ve been able to make this list of fat-positive YA that also has positive queer representation. Only one of these fat-positive queer YA books has a queer, fat main character (please, authors and publishers, we need more!) but all of these are solid both in terms of fat and queer representation.

Source: 5 Fat-Positive Queer YA Books

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Queer AND fat positive. What more can you ask for?

5 Fat-Positive Queer YA Books

Faces of Color on 2017 YA Books

It feels like 2016 was a year where books by and about people of color in the YA world were few and far between. I remember being asked at the beginning of the year to name some, and now, as the year comes to a close, I am still naming the same few.

Source: Faces of Color on 2017 YA Books

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Now more than ever we need to diversify our reading. Keep your eyes on these, if you’re a fiction lover!

Faces of Color on 2017 YA Books

5 Reasons to Participate in #Diverseathon Sept 12-19!

If you aren’t on booktube, you may not have heard about the recent controversy around a video raging against the idea of diversity in books.

Source: 5 Reasons to Participate in #Diverseathon Sept 12-19!

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This is the first time I’ve heard of #diverseathon but I love it!

5 Reasons to Participate in #Diverseathon Sept 12-19!

How to Come up with Diverse Protagonists

A couple years ago I wrote a post titled What to do When All Your Characters are White. I liked it, but in retrospect, it describes short-term solution. Panicking about representation partway throu…

Source: How to Come up with Diverse Protagonists

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Great tips on racially diversifying your cast of characters that can be used to diversify in other ways.

How to Come up with Diverse Protagonists

The Importance Of Making Characters Gay, From ‘Buffy’ To ‘Star Trek’

When I first heard that Sulu, brought to life once again by John Cho, would be depicted as a gay man in Star Trek: Beyond, I was thrilled. To find out Sulu is gay is on par with having a friend or family member come out; you already know them, you are just learning another facet of who they are.

Source: The Importance Of Making Characters Gay, From ‘Buffy’ To ‘Star Trek’

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A great post on the importance of diversifying your characters’ sexualities.

The Importance Of Making Characters Gay, From ‘Buffy’ To ‘Star Trek’

Ayres and Graces: He/She/They

Pronouns seem to be getting a lot of attention for something that on the surface seems like it should be straight (ha!) forward. So if you’re writing a story about trans, non-binary, or genderqueer people, how do you know which pronouns to use? How do you let your reader know these characters’ identities without bopping them over the head with a grammar lesson?

Source: Ayres and Graces: He/She/They

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Tips on how to properly include characters in your novel that may not use the binary he/she/her/him pronouns! I’d also like to mention that if you’re adding a trans character, maybe have more than one to avoid tokenization.

Ayres and Graces: He/She/They